2011-09-08

Bad to worse - 6 ways to kill workplace productivity

Drew Stevens

In an attempt to increase morale and productivity, organizations will attempt anything. I read an article in The Wall Street Journal (http://tinyurl.com/yc76a6g) about how to liven boring meetings. Leaders allowed crayons and water pistols for creating productivity. Such rote behavior is meant for recess not productivity. The problem with organizations today is with leaders that cannot lead and workers that have little passion. Rather than repair the issue, leaders place band-aids on surgical incisions. Fix the problem.

 

  1. Got Talent. Talent is innate. Skills cannot be taught and organizations constantly place the wrong people in the wrong positions. There are denizens of selling professionals enacting as sales managers that should be fired. Place individuals where they will succeed and aligned with talents. Eradicate the sloths.
  2. Conflict. Supervisors and managers fear conflict in the workplace. Managers fail to hold those accountable because they fear conflict. The inability to confront subordinates about poor seriously undermines productivity.
  3. Accountability. Everyone has a job and must do it. Time frames and tasks must be upheld. Those that do not comply should be dealt with.
  4. Observed behavior. Review it constantly and ensure it upholds the mission, vision and values of the organization.
  5. Stop the Circus. Save the ridiculous animal tricks, the flying canons, poster board and crayons for recess and kindergartners. Treat adults as such. If John and Peter do not like each other, one hour of mountain bike riding with a case of beer only ensures one of them will not return. This does nothing for productivity and wastes needed income.
  6. The Last Supper. Allow all to eat at the table. End the aristocracy and allow democracy. Innovation flourishes from those closest to their customers. The concept is difficult to grasp but fruitful since all organizations exist for one reason – the customer!

 

Productivity begins with candid relationships between employer and employee. It is imperative to note that individuals do not leave companies - they leave poor managers. To dilute the productivity impact, take time to build relationships with employees through personal interaction. Employees need candid feedback to increase morale, productivity and ultimately accountability.  


 

About Contributor – Drew Stevens Ph.D. Drew Stevens PhD works with organizations that struggle with productivity that effects profits. Dr. Drew works with senior officers and their direction reports to dramatically increase relationships that build higher morale. He can be reached through his website at www.stevensconsultinggroup.com ©2009. Drew J. Stevens Ph. D. All rights reserved.

 

2013-05-09

Internship journal: enhancing academic learning

Corne van Niekerk

The practical knowledge and experience gained partaking in an internship programme, allow students to experience real-life work situations, that will help prepare them when entering the workforce.

Read More

2012-04-18

The seven deadly sins of leadership

Marilyn Lustgarten

You may be an expert in your field and personally good at what you do, but if your intention is growing the business, then you have to be able to bring on and lead others effectively.

Read More

2013-04-17

Coach your employees to succeed: a 4-step primer

Drake Editorial Team

Feedback is critical to coaching. But it won't go far unless you set clear expectations for your employees. Here's how.

Read More